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Volume 11, Number 21
May 21, 2012


Physical sciences
Technology
Life sciences
Neuroscience, psychology, behavior
Health and medicine
Physical sciences

Cosmic heating by gamma rays from supermassive black holes
Stellar superflares
Arctic methane release

Technology

Life sciences

Circadian clock enzyme
Extremophiles

Neuroscience, psychology, and behavior

Health and medicine



Physical sciences


Cosmic heating by gamma rays from supermassive black holes

References:
  1. May 15, 2012 - Black holes turn up the heat for the Universe - also here, here
Background


Stellar superflares

References:
  1. May 16, 2012 - 'Superflares' erupt on some Sun-like stars
  2. May 16, 2012 - Suns Spew Superflares
  3. May 16, 2012 - Superflares from Sun-like Stars
  4. May 16, 2012 - Stellar superflares' trigger challenged
  5. May 16, 2012 - Hundreds of Superflares Seen on Sunlike Stars
  6. May 16, 2012 - Colossal Superflares Erupt from Sun-Like Stars
  7. May 17, 2012 - Kepler satellite telescope reveals hundreds of superflares on distant stars
  8. May 18, 2012 - Superflares found on Sun-like stars
Background


Arctic methane release

References:
  1. May 20, 2012 - Arctic melt releasing ancient methane
  2. May 21, 2012 - Environmental group measures methane seeps in the Arctic
  3. May 21, 2012 - Release of Arctic methane could accelerate warming
  4. May 21, 2012 - Popping the Cap on Arctic Methane
Background



Technology



Life sciences


Circadian clock enzyme

References:
  1. May 16, 2012 - A biological clock to wind them all
  2. May 16, 2012 - Biological clock began ticking 2.5 billion years ago
  3. May 16, 2012 - Researchers identify the first circadian clock component conserved across all three domains of life
  4. May 17, 2012 - Group finds circadian clock common to almost all life forms
Background


Extremophiles

References:
  1. May 17, 2012 - Buried microbes exist at limit between life and death
  2. May 17, 2012 - Barely Breathing Microbes Still Living in 86-Million-Year-Old Clay
  3. May 17, 2012 - Live Slow, Die Old
  4. May 17, 2012 - Slo-mo microbes extend the frontiers of life
  5. May 17, 2012 - It's (just barely, sort of) alive!
  6. May 18, 2012 - Bacteria alive (more or less) in 86-million-year-old seabed clay
Background



Neuroscience, psychology, and behavior



Health and medicine


Copyright © 2012 by Charles Daney, All Rights Reserved