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Volume 0, Number 2
July 9, 2001

Thermophiles
Immune system cell differentiation
Neuron regeneration
Red giant stars
Telomerase
Water and climate
Bose-Einstein condensates
Global warming
Alzheimer's Disease
Galactic growth by cannibalism
Pulsars
Evolution of nitrogen-fixing ability
Eukaryote fossils
Quantum technology
CP violation
Molecular electronics
Cloning
Antimatter
Quantum dots
Parkinson's disease


Thermophiles

References:
  1. July 2, 2001 - Where There's Soup, There's Life
Background


Immune system cell differentiation

References:
  1. July 2, 2001 - Development Of Important Immune Cells Relies On More Complicated Influences Than Scientist Had Thought
Background


Neuron regeneration

References:
  1. July 2, 2001 - Manipulating A Single Gene Dramatically Improves Regeneration In Adult Neurons
Background


Red giant stars

References:
  1. July 3, 2001 - Lasers Help Show Stars are Larger Than Thought
Background


Telomerase

References:
  1. July 3, 2001 - Telomerase Gene 'Anti-Therapy' Stalls Tumors Growing in Culture
  2. July 5, 2001 - UCSF Scientists Halt Tumor Growth By Manipulating Telomerase Enzyme
Background


Water and climate

References:
  1. July 3, 2001 - Water cools the world
Background


Bose-Einstein condensates

References:
  1. July 3, 2001 - Researchers Develop All-Optical Technique To Produce Bose-Einstein Condensates
Background


Global warming

References:
  1. July 4, 2001 - Global Warming During The 20th Century May Be Slightly Larger Than Earlier Estimates
Background


Alzheimer's Disease

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Eli Lilly and Company have shown that a specific antibody seems to increase the concentration of the beta amyloid peptide in the bloodstream of mice and decrease the amount of beta amyloid in the animal's brain. (See [1].) Beta amyloid is the substance which constitutes "plaques" that are found among the neurons of Alzheimer's disease victimes and thought to contribute to the death or disablement of those neurons.

The antibody is called m266. When it was injected into mice, the concentration of amyloid beta in their bloodstream increased 1000-fold within hours. It was found that, over a period of months, mice injected with m266 developed fewer brain plaques than control animals. The antibody therefore appears to have drawn amyloid beta out of the brain into the bloodstream. Although this may be a very important finding, the actual mechanism by which m266 acts is unclear, since it did not enter the brain itself to any significant degree.

In a completely unrelated investigation, scientists supported by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute have found that fragments of the beta amyloid precursor protein (BAPP) play a role in gene regulation within the cell itself. (See [2].) BAPP is a protein that is embedded in a cell membrane. Several enzymes snip BAPP into fragments. One particular fragment (beta amyloid) remains outside the cell and clumps together to form plaques which eventuall may kill nearby neurons. However, another fragment remains inside the cell and is capable of switching on genes.

The significance of this finding is that it may be the first which indicates any physiological role for BAPP and the cleaving of it by enzymes. BAPP is related to another protein known as "notch", and fragments of notch produced in a similar enzymatic process also appear to regulate gene activity.

References:

  1. July 4, 2001 - Study Gives Clues To Workings Of Anti-Alzheimer Antibody
  2. July 6, 2001 - Evidence That Alzheimer's Protein Switches On Genes -- Original press release
Background


Galactic growth by cannibalism

References:
  1. July 5, 2001 - Cannibalism feeds growing galaxies
  2. July 5, 2001 - Andromeda Galaxy Caught Munching On Small Neighbors
  3. July 5, 2001 - It's a cosmic jungle out there
  4. July 7, 2001 - Andromeda feasts on its satellite galaxies
Background


Pulsars

References:
  1. July 5, 2001 - Chandra Scopes Pulsar
Background


Evolution of nitrogen-fixing ability

References:
  1. July 5, 2001 - Crisis put life in a fix
  2. July 16, 2001 - Nitrates, Lightning Key to Life at Early Earth
Background


Eukaryote fossils

References:
  1. July 5, 2001 - Ancient Aussie algae reveal early history of life
Background


Quantum technology

References:
  1. July 5, 2001 - SQUIDS go superfluid
  2. July 5, 2001 - SQUIDS go superfluid
  3. July 6, 2001 - Flowing liquid revealed as quantum wave
Background


CP violation

References:
  1. July 6, 2001 - BaBar claims matter-antimatter first
Background


Molecular electronics

References:
  1. July 6, 2001 - Single electrons flick the switch
  2. July 6, 2001 - Buckled nanotubes make tiny transistors
  3. July 6, 2001 - Scientists Create First Room-Temperature Single-Electron Transistor
  4. July 9, 2001 - Nano-Transistor Switches With Just One Electron, May Be Ideal For Molecular Computers
Background


Cloning

References:
  1. July 6, 2001 - Genetic Expression in Clones Differs from That in Donor Animals
  2. July 6, 2001 - Imprinting marks clones for death
  3. July 6, 2001 - Clones contain hidden DNA damage
  4. July 9, 2001 - New Study Shows Normal-Looking Clones May Be Abnormal
Background


Antimatter

References:
  1. July 6, 2001 - Antiproton weighs in
Background


Quantum dots

References:
  1. July 7, 2001 - Wee dots yield rainbow of molecule markers
Background


Parkinson's disease

References:
  1. July 8, 2001 - Correct diagnosis hope for Parkinson's
Background


Copyright © 2001 by Charles Daney, All Rights Reserved