Open Questions: Vaccines

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See also: Infectious diseases -- Microbiology -- The immune system

Introduction

Genetic vaccines


Recommended references: Web sites

Recommended references: Magazine/journal articles

Recommended references: Books

Introduction



Recommended references: Web sites

Site indexes


Sites with general resources

Immunization, Vaccines, and Biologicals
Good collection of information provided by the World Health Organization. Includes sections on topics such as vaccine-preventable diseases, and vaccine research and development. See the site map for help in navigation.
Vaccines
A page with information on some topics on vaccines, provided by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration.

Surveys, overviews, tutorials

How Vaccines Work
Single-page tutorial, with links to related information, provided by the Mayo Clinic.
Vaccines
Provides general information about vaccines, especially in connection with research into vaccines for HIV. The information is supplied by the U. S. National Institute of Allergy and Infections Diseases and focuses on the research of that organization.
Vaccines: Smallpox and Vaccinia
Chapter 6 of the textbook Vaccines. Index. Part of the NCBI Bookshelf.
Chasing a stealthy influenza virus
July 2005 Los Angeles Times article on the technology and manufacturing of flu vaccine.
Cocaine Vaccine
November 2004 Scientific American Sidebar about experimental vaccines that stimulate the immune system to neutralize cocaine and other addictive substances.
Egg Beaters
February 2004 Scientific American In Focus article about finding better ways to manufacture flu vaccine.
Potato Vaccine against Hepatitis B
October 2000 Scientific American news article about vaccine proteins produced in potatoes.


Recommended references: Magazine/journal articles

Nice Shot: Why vaccines are pharma's Next Big Thing
Megan Scudellari
The Scientist, January 2010
Boosting Vaccines: The Power of Adjuvants
Nathalie Garçon; Michel Goldman
Scientific American, October 2009
Modern insights into the immune system have revived interest in adding ingredients that can supercharge old vaccines and make entirely new ones possible.
Edible Vaccines
William H. R. Langridge
Scientific American, September 2000
Genetic Vaccines
David B. Weiner; Ronald C. Kennedy
Scientific American, July 1999, pp. 50-57
DNA sequences obtained from pathogenic viruses and which encode for antigen proteins may conceivably be used in vaccines. There are difficulties with this approach, but human clinical trials are already in progress to test the concept.


Recommended references: Books


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